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Happening in Healthcare

  • Weaverville councilman announces candidacy - Mountain Xpress

    Saturday, February 10, 2018
    Patrick Fitzsimmons, executive director of Mountain BizWorks and Weaverville Town Council member, announced today he will be a candidate for Buncombe County Commissioner in District 2 in the upcoming Democratic primary. Fitzsimmons has over 30 years’ experience as a non-profit executive and has been an elected official since 2015....Fitzsimmons is married to Mark Conway Medlin, Senior Project Manager for Mission Health Information Technology. They reside in Weaverville.

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  • Buncombe authorities confirm 10 flu-associated deaths this season - WLOS

    Saturday, February 10, 2018
    Buncombe County Health and Human Services (BCHHS) confirmed Friday that it has had 10 confirmed flu-associated deaths this season.Seven were 65 years of age or older. Three were in 50-64 years of age.Five were not immunized against flu, and seven had underlying medical conditions.Flu activity in NC remained widespread for the week ending February 3, 2018. BCHHS says Mission Health continues to see high levels of activity due to simultaneous waves of influenza A and B. It says it expects several more weeks of high flu activity in NC and locally. From October 2, 2017 through February 3, 2018, there were 140 flu-associated deaths in NC, including four children. Influenza A(H3N2) viruses continue to predominate in NC and across the US at this time, the BCHHS said in a release.

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  • Mission Health could pull MAMA from AMC - The Macon County News

    Saturday, February 10, 2018
    “Mission Health has been exploring land options in Macon County and surrounding areas for a very long time with a goal of identifying a location for the Mountain Area Medical Airlift (MAMA II) helicopter that can improve its ability to support patients more effectively,” said Rowena Buffett Timms, Senior Vice President of Government and Community Relations, Mission Health. “Currently, the location for MAMA II at Angel Medical Center sits below the fog line and as a result, the helicopter is unable to fly as much as 40 percent of the time because of unsafe weather, including fog, clouds and storms. Morning fog and summer afternoon storms are common around Angel Medical Center.”

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  • Little hats, big hearts and women who knit - Black Mountain News

    Saturday, February 10, 2018
    About 200 babies are born each February at Mission Hospital in Asheville. Each will receive a red knitted or crocheted hat. Where did all these baby hats come from? They are the product of the knitting needles and crochet hooks of dedicated crafters all over Western North Carolina.And why red hats? February is American Heart Month, and the red hats help raise awareness of heart health and congenital heart disease in little babies, as well as men and women of all ages. Literature accompanying the hats will help families live heart-healthy lives and help their children do the same.On Jan. 30, Ruth Hoffman and Betsy Stobbs of Givens Highland Farms in Black Mountain delivered 179 little red hats to Stephen Zubrod, vice president of marketing, communications and consumer loyalty at Mission Health.

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  • Angel Medical Center Pharmacist George Carter honored with Quilt of Valor - Mountain Xpress

    Sunday, February 11, 2018
    George Carter, Angel Medical Center Pharmacist, was recently honored with a Quilt of Valor created by the Smoky Mountain Quilters Guild. George was a member of the ROTC at University of Georgia where he graduated with a Pharmacy degree as a second lieutenant.George was originally stationed in Panama at Howard Air Force Base where he became the administrator in the pharmacy. He then was stationed in Thailand where he began doing civic action duty going out into the villages doing medical community service.Following his service in Thailand, George was stationed in Nepal and was on active duty for Desert Storm. He served 11 years active duty and 14 years in the reserves, finishing his duty as a lieutenant colonel.

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  • How opioid series Age of Addiction came to be - Citizen Times

    Monday, February 12, 2018
    A group of 15 people competed for attention as N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein opened a September roundtable in McDowell County for what became a freewheeling discussion on the region’s opioid crisis...Across Western North Carolina, in eastern Tennessee and in southeastern Kentucky, hospitals are seeing hundreds of newborns delivered after being exposed to opioids in the womb. Some will need weeks of treatment for withdrawal from dependency. Mission Hospital saw a 400 percent increase in the number of children born exposed to opioids from 2010-2013

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  • Opioid crisis in Buncombe termed severe – Daily Planet

    Monday, February 12, 2018
    In response, she said the county “is filing a lawsuit against the drug manufacturers. We’re trying to cultivate more peer to peer support. What we know is that abstinence does not work…. But the biggest thing we’ve done is education. One message is, ‘if you go home, and you have oxcycodone (and similar drugs), take them to the (Buncombe) Sheriff’s Office.”Frost asked everyone to remember “that 80 percent of the people addicted start with a legal prescription.”Further, the county commissioner from Black Mountain said, “Tell a child, especially, that one Tylenol and/or one Ibuprofen” is a better and safer option than taking drugs that lead to opioid addiction. “We’re working actively with Mission (Hospital)” to encourage doctors and parents and other caregivers to encourage people to take a single Tylenol or Ibuprofen tablet instead of oxycodone.”

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  • What does a successful AI and analytics program look like? - Healthcare IT News

    Tuesday, February 13, 2018
    Table stakes. That’s what the ability for hospitals to leverage analytics today has become, according to Chris DeRienzo, chief quality officer at Asheville, North Carolina-based Mission Health. But actually using the insights gained from those analytics projects, putting them to work driving enterprise-wide improvements in quality and efficiency takes quite a bit more doing. Mission has enabled a 58 percent increase in sepsis detection, a 32 percent reduction in severe sepsis mortality rates, a 20 percent increase in on-time surgery starts and more. It's accomplished all this while all while reducing the staff hours needed to wrangle data and prepare reports. DeRienzo pointed to three case studies from the health system – one focused on the development and diffusion of its care process models, one on driving improvements in ED throughout and one focused on AI and machine learning – to show "how we built the process and then used our tools to drive to an outcome," he said.

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